The issue I always come across is pixel density. Generally, the smaller your device, the higher the pixel density is. So if you serve a lower res image to the smaller screens, you end up with images that look very blurry – and when we’ve tried that, the client always complains how bad images look on their iPad and iPhone. We end up serving images that are only 5-10% smaller file sizes for a relatively large investment of developer time. For sites that are not image galleries, and do not have to load fifty images per page, we find it is better to still use the old methods and make sure images are properly optimised on upload. Most images would be around 80kb, even large images would be a max of 150kb. The issue I always come across is pixel density. Generally, the smaller your device, the higher the pixel density is. So if you serve a lower res image to the smaller screens, you end up with images that look very blurry – and when we’ve tried that, the client always complains how bad images look on their iPad and iPhone. We end up serving images that are only 5-10% smaller file sizes for a relatively large investment of developer time. For sites that are not image galleries, and do not have to load fifty images per page, we find it is better to still use the old methods and make sure images are properly optimised on upload. Most images would be around 80kb, even large images would be a max of 150kb.The issue I always come across is pixel density. Generally, the smaller your device, the higher the pixel density is. So if you serve a lower res image to the smaller screens, you end up with images that look very blurry – and when we’ve tried that, the client always complains how bad images look on their iPad and iPhone. We end up serving images that are only 5-10% smaller file sizes for a relatively large investment of developer time. For sites that are not image galleries, and do not have to load fifty images per page, we find it is better to still use the old methods and make sure images are properly optimised on upload. Most images would be around 80kb, even large images would be a max of 150kb. The issue I always come across is pixel density. Generally, the smaller your device, the higher the pixel density is. So if you serve a lower res image to the smaller screens, you end up with images that look very blurry – and when we’ve tried that, the client always complains how bad images look on their iPad and iPhone. We end up serving images that are only 5-10% smaller file sizes for a relatively large investment of developer time. For sites that are not image galleries, and do not have to load fifty images per page, we find it is better to still use the old methods and make sure images are properly optimised on upload. Most images would be around 80kb, even large images would be a max of 150kb.